Does wearing pajamas have a positive effect if we work from home?

 

Does wearing pajamas have a positive effect if we work from home?

 


Wearing pajamas while working from home

It makes sense now, more than ever before, to wear casual clothes when going to work! After all, most of us now no longer have to go to work, and colleagues no longer see us as we work from home.

 

Video conferencing meetings can quickly put on a tidy and decent top piece, without having to change your comfortable pajama pants!

 

But how does this kind of behavior affect the way we think about ourselves and our productivity? Do we really work better when wearing a shirt or work jacket?

 

Scientific answer

 

Many studies respond to this question in the affirmative, for example, researchers in the United States have found that people who should remain in high concentration sit it is easier to wear a white lab coat associated with doctors and scientists.

 

While it is unlikely that you will wear a doctor's coat at work from home, the nature of the garment is really important, says petera linhoub: "The working day begins in front of the wardrobe, the appropriate clothes increase self-esteem and self-confidence, and make one work more productively."

 

This effect also depends on what you personally associate with certain clothing, "if you are used, for example, to wearing a jacket to go to work," according to Caroline Pfau, a member of the German Vocational Training Association.

 

"Therefore, work has been linked to this type of clothing all these years," she says, and this can become part of an ingrained behaviour that results in higher productivity.

 

It's psychologically a matter of

 

Psychologist Andreas Bechler explains: "If you dress rationally to work from home, it will put you in a different state of mind, even though there are people who can manage this while they wear pajamas."

 

People who think others see them as more efficient while wearing stylish clothes will feel more comfortable wearing these types of clothing, according to trainer Carolyn Pfaw.

 

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